Daily Archives: March 30, 2010

NBA Basketball in Seattle, If Only For a Day

If you’ve ever visited our site before, you probably know which side we’re on when it comes to Seattle vs. Oklahoma City. We’re not the only ones either. Ray Allen is taking charge putting together a charity game to help bring NBA basketball back to the Emerald City. Also scheduled to play in the game are Seattle natives Brandon Roy, Jamal Crawford, Aaron Brooks, and Jason Terry. Noticeably absent from the list is Nate Robinson, but I’m willing to bet when push comes to shove he’ll be there. I think this is a great move on the part of these players. There’s no doubt that Seattle shouldn’t be a 4 sport city. Although, with the Canucks right up the road in Vancouver, it’s not as much of a travesty that they don’t have an NHL team, but they definitely should have an NBA franchise there. I’m not going to go so far as to say they deserve one more than Sacramento, because despite recent figures, Sacramento has proved a long time ago that they can draw sellout crowds for years on end. What stands out to me is Seattle has a history with basketball. The city has produced the likes of the aforementioned players, along with many more. Few cities can match the level of pride that Seattle has, and I hope this game takes them one step closer to once again having a franchise there.

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McNabb Exiled to the Raiders… Not Quite Yet…

I’ve read about all I can about the possible trade of McNabb coming to the Raiders. It’s funny how ESPN reports that there’s a set deal in place, and the local bay area papers can’t find a source within the organization that will even say the two teams have even talked about a trade. Usually I don’t like to write about a trade unless it actually happens, especially when there are still some other teams that are in the McNabb sweepstakes, and Al Davis hasn’t openly said he was trying to acquire the QB, but our buddy AP’s take on the whole matter made me want to write why it’s a good move. I think it would be a great move if they do it for their 2nd round pick, and would be 10,000% behind it. If they trade away Asomugha too, I’d make it more of a 50/50 trade. A lot of people that don’t follow the Raiders seem to think it’s a waste of time and money for them. Raider Nation knows that Davis is running out of time on this earth, and has plenty of money he’s willing to spend to see them succeed, whether they are smart moves or not. Losing Asomugha would effectively open up one side of the field, and weaken the not so steady CB play behind Namandi. Is there a better place for McNabb? Probably, but there’s worse destinations as he could land in. The Raiders are historically a team full of misfits, and the way McNabb has been persecuted the last few years in Philly would make him a good fit. Another big plus to this move would be Jamarcus can have all the Cambell’s Chunky Soup he could ever want sitting on the sidelines. Maybe he’d lose a few pounds not eating all those burgers. I like the move, so lets get into my reasons on why. Continue reading


The Venditte Rule

I remember reading about Pat Venditte when the Yankees drafted him. He’s the only ambidextrous (switch pitcher) I’ve ever seen or really heard of. I hope he makes it, mainly to see him switch throwing arms on different batters. I’m not sure how good his stuff is, but if he has some good movement he will always have a favorable match up. He has a six fingered glove that allows him to use the glove on both hands. Anyways, the at-bat below between him and a switch hitter towards the end of the season in Class A ball game for the Yankees prompted The Professional Baseball Umpire Corporation (PBUC) to make the following rule. If nothing else happens, and he doesn’t make the pros, at least he put his stamp on the game!

The Pat Venditte Rule

  • The pitcher must visually indicate to the umpire, batter and runner(s) which way he will begin pitching to the batter. Engaging the rubber with the glove on a particular hand is considered a definitive commitment to which arm he will throw with. The batter will then choose which side of the plate he will bat from.
  • The pitcher must throw one pitch to the batter before any “switch” by either player is allowed.
  • After one pitch is thrown, the pitcher and batter may each change positions one time per at-bat. For example, if the pitcher changes from right-handed to left-handed and the batter then changes batter’s boxes, each player must remain that way for the duration of that at-bat (unless the offensive team substitutes a pinch hitter, and then each player may again “switch” one time).
  • Any switch (by either the pitcher or the batter) must be clearly indicated to the umpire. There will be no warm-up pitches during the change of arms.
  • If an injury occurs the pitcher may change arms but not use that arm again during the remainder of the game.